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Viruses 2016, 8(9), 258; doi:10.3390/v8090258

Capsid-Targeted Viral Inactivation: A Novel Tactic for Inhibiting Replication in Viral Infections

1
Avian Disease Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine of Sichuan Agricultural University, Wenjiang District, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan Province, China
2
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, Wenjiang District, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan Province, China
3
Institute of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Wenjiang District, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan Province, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alexander Ploss
Received: 13 July 2016 / Revised: 8 September 2016 / Accepted: 15 September 2016 / Published: 21 September 2016
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Abstract

Capsid-targeted viral inactivation (CTVI), a conceptually powerful new antiviral strategy, is attracting increasing attention from researchers. Specifically, this strategy is based on fusion between the capsid protein of a virus and a crucial effector molecule, such as a nuclease (e.g., staphylococcal nuclease, Barrase, RNase HI), lipase, protease, or single-chain antibody (scAb). In general, capsid proteins have a major role in viral integration and assembly, and the effector molecule used in CTVI functions to degrade viral DNA/RNA or interfere with proper folding of viral key proteins, thereby affecting the infectivity of progeny viruses. Interestingly, such a capsid–enzyme fusion protein is incorporated into virions during packaging. CTVI is more efficient compared to other antiviral methods, and this approach is promising for antiviral prophylaxis and therapy. This review summarizes the mechanism and utility of CTVI and provides some successful applications of this strategy, with the ultimate goal of widely implementing CTVI in antiviral research. View Full-Text
Keywords: Capsid-targeted viral inactivation; antiviral strategy; core protein; degradative enzyme; fusion proteins Capsid-targeted viral inactivation; antiviral strategy; core protein; degradative enzyme; fusion proteins
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, X.; Jia, R.; Zhou, J.; Wang, M.; Yin, Z.; Cheng, A. Capsid-Targeted Viral Inactivation: A Novel Tactic for Inhibiting Replication in Viral Infections. Viruses 2016, 8, 258.

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