Next Article in Journal
On the Effect of Thinning on Tree Growth and Stand Structure of White Birch (Betula platyphylla Sukaczev) and Siberian Larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb.) in Mongolia
Previous Article in Journal
Simulated Summer Rainfall Variability Effects on Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda) Seedling Physiology and Susceptibility to Root-Infecting Ophiostomatoid Fungi
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2017, 8(4), 106; doi:10.3390/f8040106

Biophysical and Economic Analysis of Black Spruce Regeneration in Eastern Canada Using Global Climate Model Productivity Outputs

1
School of Geography & Earth Sciences and McMaster Centre for Climate Change, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
2
Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Sault Ste. Marie, ON P6A 2E5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Damian C. Adams
Received: 11 October 2016 / Revised: 22 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3173 KB, uploaded 31 March 2017]   |  

Abstract

We explore the biophysical potential and economic attractiveness of black spruce (Picea mariana) regeneration in eastern Canada under the high greenhouse gas emission scenario (RCP 8.5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The study integrates net primary productivity and net ecosystem productivity estimates from three major global climate models (GCMs), growth and yield equations specific to black spruce, and economic analyses to determine spatially varying investment values of black spruce regeneration—both including and excluding carbon sequestration benefits. Net present value (NPV) was used to represent financial attractiveness. It was assumed that stands would not be harvested at volumes less than 80 m3·ha−1. A baseline case with the stumpage price set to $20 m−3, stand establishment cost $500 ha−1, and the discount rate 4%, was used with wide-ranging sensitivity analyses conducted around these assumptions. These values represent the wide range of choices and outcomes possible with black spruce regeneration investments. The results indicated a latitudinal gradient in economic attractiveness, with higher forest productivity and NPVs in the southern portion of the study area; however, black spruce regeneration was not economically attractive unless regeneration costs were very low (representing something closer to a natural regeneration type scenario) and/or carbon sequestration benefits of at least $5 ton−1 CO2 were realized. In general, the optimal harvest rotation age increased with increasing carbon price by approximately 9 to 18 years. Results of this study highlight the importance of future price and yield expectations and establishment costs in evaluating forest investments. View Full-Text
Keywords: afforestation; growth and yield model; carbon sequestration; forest economics; net primary production afforestation; growth and yield model; carbon sequestration; forest economics; net primary production
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, J.; McKenney, D.W.; Pedlar, J.H.; Arain, M.A. Biophysical and Economic Analysis of Black Spruce Regeneration in Eastern Canada Using Global Climate Model Productivity Outputs. Forests 2017, 8, 106.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top