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Forests 2017, 8(12), 438; doi:10.3390/f8120438

Sequential Management of Commercial Rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) Plantations in Central Amazonia: Seeking Sustainable Models for Essential Oil Production

1
National Institute of Amazonian Research—INPA, Manaus 69067-375, Brazil
2
Forest Sciences Department, University of São Paulo—USP, Piracicaba 13418-000, Brazil
3
Federal University of Amazonas—UFAM, Manaus 69067-005, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 August 2017 / Revised: 24 October 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 28 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Sustainable Management)

Abstract

Rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) is an endangered tree that produces essential oil of high commercial value. However, technical-scientific knowledge about cultivation is scarce and studies are needed to examine the management viability. The current study evaluated rosewood aboveground biomass management, measuring the export of nutrients resulting from harvesting and testing sustainable management models. The crown of 36 rosewood trees were pruned and 108 trees cut at 50 cm above the soil in two regions in Central Amazonia. Post-harvest performance of sprouting shoots was evaluated and after, sprouting shoots were pruned so that the development of two, three and all shoots was permitted. Nutrient stock estimation was calculated as the product of mass and nutrient concentration, which allowed nutritional replacement to be estimated. The pruning facilitates regrowth by 40.11% of the initial mass while by cut regrow 1.45%. Chemical attributes of regrowth biomass differed significantly prior to management and regrowth had a significant correlation with the reserves in root tissues and with the pre -management status of the individual tree. Driving sprouts resulted in significantly larger growth increments and may provide a form of management that can viably be adopted. Biomass sequential management resulted in high nutrient exports and the amount of fertilizer needed for replenishment depended on the intensity and frequency of cropping. Compared with the cut of the tree, pruning the canopy reduces fertilizers that are required to replenish amount by 44%, decreasing to 26.37% in the second rotation. The generated knowledge contributes to this silvicultural practice as it becomes ecologically and economically viable. View Full-Text
Keywords: amazon planted forest; endangered tree; species conservation; above-ground biomass management; harvest methodologies amazon planted forest; endangered tree; species conservation; above-ground biomass management; harvest methodologies
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Krainovic, P.M.; Almeida, D.R.A.; Desconci, D.; Veiga-Júnior, V.F.; Sampaio, P.T.B. Sequential Management of Commercial Rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke) Plantations in Central Amazonia: Seeking Sustainable Models for Essential Oil Production. Forests 2017, 8, 438.

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