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Forests 2015, 6(12), 4421-4438; doi:10.3390/f6124377

Applying Resilience Concepts in Forest Management: A Retrospective Simulation Approach

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, Government of British Columbia, PO Box 9515 Stn, Provincial Government, Victoria, BC V8W 9C2, Canada
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Academic Editors: Francis E. "Jack" Putz and Eric J. Jokela
Received: 4 September 2015 / Revised: 9 November 2015 / Accepted: 19 November 2015 / Published: 1 December 2015
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Abstract

Increasing the resilience of ecological and sociological systems has been proposed as an option to adapt to changing future climatic conditions. However, few studies test the applicability of those strategies to forest management. This paper uses a real forest health incident to assess the ability of forest management strategies to affect ecological and economic resilience of the forest. Two landscape scale strategies are compared to business as usual management for their ability to increase resilience to a climate-change induced mountain pine beetle outbreak in the Kamloops Timber Supply Area, British Columbia, Canada for the period 1980 to 2060. Proactive management to reduce high risk species while maintaining or increasing diversity through reforestation was found to be more resilient in terms of the metrics: post-disturbance growing stock, improved volume and stability of timber flow, and net revenue. However, landscape-scale indicators of diversity were little affected by management. Our results were robust to uncertainty in tree growth rates and timber value and show that adapting to climate change through improving the resilience of forested landscapes is an economically viable option. View Full-Text
Keywords: biodiversity; adaptation; climate change; forestry; timber supply; temperate forests; landscape ecology; economic analysis biodiversity; adaptation; climate change; forestry; timber supply; temperate forests; landscape ecology; economic analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Dymond, C.C.; Spittlehouse, D.L.; Tedder, S.; Hopkins, K.; McCallion, K.; Sandland, J. Applying Resilience Concepts in Forest Management: A Retrospective Simulation Approach. Forests 2015, 6, 4421-4438.

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