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Forests 2014, 5(11), 2865-2881; doi:10.3390/f5112865

Changes in Income Structure in Frontier Villages and Implications for REDD+ Benefit Sharing

1
Department of Forest Management, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, 1, Matsunosato, Tsukuba, Ibaragi 305-8687, Japan
2
Institute of Forest and Wildlife Research and Development, Forestry Administration, Street 1019, Phum Rongchak, Sankat Phnom Penh Thmei, Khan Sen Sok, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 August 2014 / Revised: 13 November 2014 / Accepted: 18 November 2014 / Published: 24 November 2014
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Abstract

A methodological characteristic of the REDD+ scheme is that it attempts to reduce deforestation by rewarding communities that change problematic land use practices. This has led to discussions on benefit sharing. This article focuses on incentives for alternative land use practices among village members living in frontier areas, especially in relation to support for sustainable land use and people’s livelihoods, and clarifies the issues that REDD+ projects are likely to face in this context. Although some documents regarding REDD+ projects have mentioned support to encourage such incentives, insufficient consideration has been given to the realities of the changes in frontier communities. REDD+ projects are unlikely to motivate members to embrace alternative land use practices if support or benefit sharing does not match members’ expectations. Here, we examine the changes in household (HH) income and structure, as well as in livelihood activities, experienced by Cambodian frontier villagers living at the site of a planned REDD+ project. During the nine years compared in this study, the frontier villages experienced broad and imbalanced changes in HH income owing to the rapid expansion of the cultivation of cash crops. Our results indicate that benefit sharing or support inevitably becomes more difficult and challenging in frontier areas than in areas where subsistence production systems still predominate, although such frontiers could, in theory, yield maximum returns with regard to forest carbon balance if the REDD+ projects addressed benefit sharing and support and came to fruition. View Full-Text
Keywords: REDD+; benefit sharing; incentive; frontier community; household income; production system; land use; Cambodia REDD+; benefit sharing; incentive; frontier community; household income; production system; land use; Cambodia
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kurashima, T.; Matsuura, T.; Miyamoto, A.; Sano, M.; Tith, B.; Chann, S. Changes in Income Structure in Frontier Villages and Implications for REDD+ Benefit Sharing. Forests 2014, 5, 2865-2881.

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