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Forests 2012, 3(4), 896-902; doi:10.3390/f3040896
Communication

Plant Invasions: Symptoms and Contributors Rather Than Causes of Environmental Degradation

Received: 19 July 2012; in revised form: 11 September 2012 / Accepted: 1 October 2012 / Published: 8 October 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exotic and Invasive Plant Species Impacting Forests)
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Abstract: Native or exotic woody plants can proliferate in dry and moist eucalypt ecosystems shading out many other native species, contributing to chronic decline of eucalypts and reinforcing unnatural fire regimes and nutrient cycling processes. Whether native or exotic, they proliferate as a consequence of disturbances which impact directly on these ecosystems. The most extensive ongoing disturbance since European occupation of Australia has been the disruption of frequent mild burning by humans. This burning maintained dynamically stable nutrient cycling processes and a competitive balance in dry and moist eucalypt systems and prevented plant “invasions”.
Keywords: eucalypt; invasive plants; fire; nutrient cycling; competitive balance; man; disturbance eucalypt; invasive plants; fire; nutrient cycling; competitive balance; man; disturbance
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jurskis, V. Plant Invasions: Symptoms and Contributors Rather Than Causes of Environmental Degradation. Forests 2012, 3, 896-902.

AMA Style

Jurskis V. Plant Invasions: Symptoms and Contributors Rather Than Causes of Environmental Degradation. Forests. 2012; 3(4):896-902.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jurskis, Vic. 2012. "Plant Invasions: Symptoms and Contributors Rather Than Causes of Environmental Degradation." Forests 3, no. 4: 896-902.


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