Next Article in Journal
Fire Effects on Soils in Lake States Forests: A Compilation of Published Research to Facilitate Long-Term Investigations
Next Article in Special Issue
Allometry for Biomass Estimation in Jatropha Trees Planted as Boundary Hedge in Farmers’ Fields
Previous Article in Journal
Invasive Plant Species in the National Parks of Vietnam
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2012, 3(4), 1017-1033; doi:10.3390/f3041017

American Chestnut Growth and Survival Five Years after Planting in Two Silvicultural Treatments in the Southern Appalachians, USA

1
Southern Research Station, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, 2431 Joe Johnson Drive, Room 274, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
2
Southern Research Station, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, 1577 Brevard Rd., Asheville, NC 28806, USA
3
Southern Research Station, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, 200 W.T. Weaver Blvd., Asheville, NC 28804, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 August 2012 / Revised: 26 October 2012 / Accepted: 31 October 2012 / Published: 9 November 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Restoration and Regeneration)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [234 KB, uploaded 9 November 2012]   |  

Abstract

The ability to restore American chestnut (Castanea dentata) through the planting of blight-resistant (Cryphonectria parasitica) trees is currently being tested. Forest-based research on the species’ silvicultural requirements and chestnut blight development are lacking. Pure American chestnut seedlings were planted in a two-age shelterwood forest with low residual basal area and in a midstory-removal treatment with high residual basal area. Survival did not differ between silvicultural treatments and averaged 67 percent across both treatments by the fifth year. Trees in the two-age shelterwood were 2.36 m and 16.8 mm larger in height and ground-line diameter, respectively, compared to trees in the midstory-removal by the fifth growing season. Blight occurrence was not affected by silvicultural treatment. Exploratory analyses indicated that seedling grading at planting and keeping trees free-to-grow through competition control would have resulted in a two-year gain in height and GLD growth in the two-age shelterwood treatment. The two-age shelterwood represented the most efficacious prescription for chestnut restoration, but the midstory-removal prescription may offer a reasonable alternative in areas where harvesting must be delayed.
Keywords: American chestnut; artificial regeneration; forest management; midstory-removal; restoration; shelterwood harvesting American chestnut; artificial regeneration; forest management; midstory-removal; restoration; shelterwood harvesting
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Clark, S.; McNab, H.; Loftis, D.; Zarnoch, S. American Chestnut Growth and Survival Five Years after Planting in Two Silvicultural Treatments in the Southern Appalachians, USA. Forests 2012, 3, 1017-1033.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top