Forests 2012, 3(4), 1017-1033; doi:10.3390/f3041017
Article

American Chestnut Growth and Survival Five Years after Planting in Two Silvicultural Treatments in the Southern Appalachians, USA

1 Southern Research Station, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, 2431 Joe Johnson Drive, Room 274, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA 2 Southern Research Station, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, 1577 Brevard Rd., Asheville, NC 28806, USA 3 Southern Research Station, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, 200 W.T. Weaver Blvd., Asheville, NC 28804, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 August 2012; in revised form: 26 October 2012 / Accepted: 31 October 2012 / Published: 9 November 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Restoration and Regeneration)
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Abstract: The ability to restore American chestnut (Castanea dentata) through the planting of blight-resistant (Cryphonectria parasitica) trees is currently being tested. Forest-based research on the species’ silvicultural requirements and chestnut blight development are lacking. Pure American chestnut seedlings were planted in a two-age shelterwood forest with low residual basal area and in a midstory-removal treatment with high residual basal area. Survival did not differ between silvicultural treatments and averaged 67 percent across both treatments by the fifth year. Trees in the two-age shelterwood were 2.36 m and 16.8 mm larger in height and ground-line diameter, respectively, compared to trees in the midstory-removal by the fifth growing season. Blight occurrence was not affected by silvicultural treatment. Exploratory analyses indicated that seedling grading at planting and keeping trees free-to-grow through competition control would have resulted in a two-year gain in height and GLD growth in the two-age shelterwood treatment. The two-age shelterwood represented the most efficacious prescription for chestnut restoration, but the midstory-removal prescription may offer a reasonable alternative in areas where harvesting must be delayed.
Keywords: American chestnut; artificial regeneration; forest management; midstory-removal; restoration; shelterwood harvesting

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MDPI and ACS Style

Clark, S.; McNab, H.; Loftis, D.; Zarnoch, S. American Chestnut Growth and Survival Five Years after Planting in Two Silvicultural Treatments in the Southern Appalachians, USA. Forests 2012, 3, 1017-1033.

AMA Style

Clark S, McNab H, Loftis D, Zarnoch S. American Chestnut Growth and Survival Five Years after Planting in Two Silvicultural Treatments in the Southern Appalachians, USA. Forests. 2012; 3(4):1017-1033.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clark, Stacy; McNab, Henry; Loftis, David; Zarnoch, Stanley. 2012. "American Chestnut Growth and Survival Five Years after Planting in Two Silvicultural Treatments in the Southern Appalachians, USA." Forests 3, no. 4: 1017-1033.

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