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Forests, Volume 1, Issue 2 (June 2010), Pages 82-98

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Research

Open AccessCommunication Three-Dimensional Landscape Visualizations: New Technique towards Wildfire and Forest Bark Beetle Management
Forests 2010, 1(2), 82-98; doi:10.3390/f1020082
Received: 12 February 2010 / Revised: 2 April 2010 / Accepted: 12 April 2010 / Published: 19 April 2010
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1561 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
After a century of fire exclusion, western US forests are vulnerable to wildfire and bark beetles. Although integrated fire and pest management programs (e.g., prescribed burning and thinning) are being implemented efficiently, damage to forests continues. Management challenges come in the forms of
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After a century of fire exclusion, western US forests are vulnerable to wildfire and bark beetles. Although integrated fire and pest management programs (e.g., prescribed burning and thinning) are being implemented efficiently, damage to forests continues. Management challenges come in the forms of diverse land ownership, dynamic forest landscapes, the uncertainty effect of management strategies, and social interaction of the increasing wildland-urban interface. Three-dimensional (3-D) landscape visualization is comprised of multi-spatial, multi-temporal, and multi-expression elements. Supplemented with GIS database, remote sensing images, and simulation models, this technique can provide a comprehensive communication medium for decision makers, scientists, stakeholders, and the public with diverse backgrounds on the wildfire and forest bark beetle management. The technique we describe here can be used to organize complicated temporal and spatial information, evaluate alternative management operations, and improve decision-making processes. The application and limitations of our technique are also discussed. Full article

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