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Materials 2016, 9(6), 467; doi:10.3390/ma9060467

The Repetitive Detection of Toluene with Bioluminescence Bioreporter Pseudomonas putida TVA8 Encapsulated in Silica Hydrogel on an Optical Fiber

1
Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, v.v.i., Rozvojová 135, 16500 Praha 6, Czech Republic
2
Faculty of Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyně University in Ústí nad Labem, Králova Výšina 3132/7, 40096 Ústí nad Labem, Czech Republic
3
Center for Environmental Biotechnology, The University of Tennessee, 676 Dabney Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jie Zheng, Yuping Bao and John Zhanhu Guo
Received: 11 May 2016 / Revised: 2 June 2016 / Accepted: 7 June 2016 / Published: 15 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Biomaterials and Biointerfaces)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [5943 KB, uploaded 15 June 2016]   |  

Abstract

Living cells of the lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas putida TVA8 were encapsulated in a silica hydrogel attached to the distal wider end of a tapered quartz fiber. Bioluminescence of immobilized cells was induced with toluene at high (26.5 mg/L) and low (5.3 mg/L) concentrations. Initial bioluminescence maxima were achieved after >12 h. One week after immobilization, a biofilm-like layer of cells had formed on the surface of the silica gel. This resulted in shorter response times and more intensive bioluminescence maxima that appeared as rapidly as 2 h after toluene induction. Considerable second bioluminescence maxima were observed after inductions with 26.5 mg toluene/L. The second and third week after immobilization the biosensor repetitively and semiquantitatively detected toluene in buffered medium. Due to silica gel dissolution and biofilm detachment, the bioluminescent signal was decreasing 20–32 days after immobilization and completely extinguished after 32 days. The reproducible formation of a surface cell layer on the wider end of the tapered optical fiber can be translated to various whole cell bioluminescent biosensor devices and may serve as a platform for in-situ sensors. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioluminescent biosensor; silica gel; encapsulation; optical fiber biosensor; whole cell bioreporter bioluminescent biosensor; silica gel; encapsulation; optical fiber biosensor; whole cell bioreporter
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kuncová, G.; Ishizaki, T.; Solovyev, A.; Trögl, J.; Ripp, S. The Repetitive Detection of Toluene with Bioluminescence Bioreporter Pseudomonas putida TVA8 Encapsulated in Silica Hydrogel on an Optical Fiber. Materials 2016, 9, 467.

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