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Materials 2016, 9(1), 27; doi:10.3390/ma9010027

Development of a Hopkinson Bar Apparatus for Testing Soft Materials: Application to a Closed-Cell Aluminum Foam

1
European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC), IPSC, ELSA, Via E. Fermi 2749, Ispra (VA) 21027, Italy
2
Aluinvent Zrt., Ipari Park, Szeles utca 2, Felsőzsolca H-3561, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sven De Schampheleire
Received: 20 November 2015 / Revised: 22 December 2015 / Accepted: 29 December 2015 / Published: 5 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Foams: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [5066 KB, uploaded 5 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

An increasing interest in lightweight metallic foams for automotive, aerospace, and other applications has been observed in recent years. This is mainly due to the weight reduction that can be achieved using foams and for their mechanical energy absorption and acoustic damping capabilities. An accurate knowledge of the mechanical behavior of these materials, especially under dynamic loadings, is thus necessary. Unfortunately, metal foams and in general “soft” materials exhibit a series of peculiarities that make difficult the adoption of standard testing techniques for their high strain-rate characterization. This paper presents an innovative apparatus, where high strain-rate tests of metal foams or other soft materials can be performed by exploiting the operating principle of the Hopkinson bar methods. Using the pre-stress method to generate directly a long compression pulse (compared with traditional SHPB), a displacement of about 20 mm can be applied to the specimen with a single propagating wave, suitable for evaluating the whole stress-strain curve of medium-sized cell foams (pores of about 1–2 mm). The potential of this testing rig is shown in the characterization of a closed-cell aluminum foam, where all the above features are amply demonstrated. View Full-Text
Keywords: Hopkinson bar; dynamic material properties; aluminum foams; high strain-rate; soft-materials; MHPB Hopkinson bar; dynamic material properties; aluminum foams; high strain-rate; soft-materials; MHPB
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Peroni, M.; Solomos, G.; Babcsan, N. Development of a Hopkinson Bar Apparatus for Testing Soft Materials: Application to a Closed-Cell Aluminum Foam. Materials 2016, 9, 27.

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