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Materials 2011, 4(6), 1144-1167; doi:10.3390/ma4061144

In Vivo Corrosion of Two Novel Magnesium Alloys ZEK100 and AX30 and Their Mechanical Suitability as Biodegradable Implants

1
University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover Foundation, Small Animal Clinic, Buenteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, Germany
2
Institute of Materials Science, Hannover Center for Production Technology, University of Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen, Germany
3
Department of Orthopedics, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries Straße 11, 30167 Hannover, Germany
4
Clinic for Small Animal Surgery and Reproduction, Centre of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Veterinaerstr. 13, 80539 Muenchen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 May 2011 / Accepted: 15 June 2011 / Published: 21 June 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedic Biomaterials)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [687 KB, 23 June 2011; original version 21 June 2011]   |  

Abstract

In magnesium alloys, the components used modify the alloy properties. For magnesium implants in contact with bone, rare earths alloys are commonly examined. These were shown to have a higher corrosion resistance than other alloys and a high mechanical strength, but their exact composition is hard to predict. Therefore a reduction of their content could be favorable. The alloys ZEK100 and AX30 have a reduced content or contain no rare earths at all. The aim of the study was to investigate their in vivo degradation and to assess the suitability of the in vivo µCT for the examination of their corrosion. Implants were inserted in rabbit tibiae. Clinical examinations, X-rays and in vivo µCT scans were done regularly. Afterwards implants were analyzed with REM, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX), weighing and mechanical testing. The in vivo µCT is of great advantage, because it allows a quantification of the corrosion rate and qualitative 3D assessment of the corrosion morphology. The location of the implant has a remarkable effect on the corrosion rate. Due to its mechanical characteristics and its corrosion behavior, ZEK100 was judged to be suitable, while AX30, which displays favorable degradation behavior, has too little mechanical strength for applications in weight bearing bones.
Keywords: biodegradation; magnesium alloy; mechanical stability; animal model; µ computed tomography biodegradation; magnesium alloy; mechanical stability; animal model; µ computed tomography
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Huehnerschulte, T.A.; Angrisani, N.; Rittershaus, D.; Bormann, D.; Windhagen, H.; Meyer-Lindenberg, A. In Vivo Corrosion of Two Novel Magnesium Alloys ZEK100 and AX30 and Their Mechanical Suitability as Biodegradable Implants. Materials 2011, 4, 1144-1167.

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