Next Article in Journal
Techno-Economic Analysis of Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass in China: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover
Next Article in Special Issue
Molecular and Isotopic Composition of Volatiles in Gas Hydrates and in Sediment from the Joetsu Basin, Eastern Margin of the Japan Sea
Previous Article in Journal
Acceleration Slip Regulation Strategy for Distributed Drive Electric Vehicles with Independent Front Axle Drive Motors
Previous Article in Special Issue
Deep Sediment-Sourced Methane Contribution to Shallow Sediment Organic Carbon: Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf, Gulf of Mexico
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Energies 2015, 8(5), 4073-4095; doi:10.3390/en8054073

Transport Mechanisms for CO2-CH4 Exchange and Safe CO2 Storage in Hydrate-Bearing Sandstone

Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, 5007 Bergen, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Richard Coffin
Received: 18 January 2015 / Revised: 12 April 2015 / Accepted: 23 April 2015 / Published: 8 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ocean Natural Gas Hydrate 2014)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2020 KB, uploaded 8 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

CO2 injection in hydrate-bearing sediments induces methane (CH4) production while benefitting from CO2 storage, as demonstrated in both core and field scale studies. CH4 hydrates have been formed repeatedly in partially water saturated Bentheim sandstones. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and CH4 consumption from pump logs have been used to verify final CH4 hydrate saturation. Gas Chromatography (GC) in combination with a Mass Flow Meter was used to quantify CH4 recovery during CO2 injection. The overall aim has been to study the impact of CO2 in fractured and non-fractured samples to determine the performance of CO2-induced CH4 hydrate production. Previous efforts focused on diffusion-driven exchange from a fracture volume. This approach was limited by gas dilution, where free and produced CH4 reduced the CO2 concentration and subsequent driving force for both diffusion and exchange. This limitation was targeted by performing experiments where CO2 was injected continuously into the spacer volume to maintain a high driving force. To evaluate the effect of diffusion length multi-fractured core samples were used, which demonstrated that length was not the dominating effect on core scale. An additional set of experiments is presented on non-fractured samples, where diffusion-limited transportation was assisted by continuous CO2 injection and CH4 displacement. Loss of permeability was addressed through binary gas (N2/CO2) injection, which regained injectivity and sustained CO2-CH4 exchange. View Full-Text
Keywords: CO2 sequestration; CO2 exchange; gas hydrate production; temperature effects; diffusion; exchange driving force CO2 sequestration; CO2 exchange; gas hydrate production; temperature effects; diffusion; exchange driving force
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Birkedal, K.A.; Hauge, L.P.; Graue, A.; Ersland, G. Transport Mechanisms for CO2-CH4 Exchange and Safe CO2 Storage in Hydrate-Bearing Sandstone. Energies 2015, 8, 4073-4095.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Energies EISSN 1996-1073 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top