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Energies 2011, 4(10), 1763-1778; doi:10.3390/en4101763
Article

Kaolinite and Silica Dispersions in Low-Salinity Environments: Impact on a Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Stability

1
 and 2,*
Received: 11 August 2011; in revised form: 17 October 2011 / Accepted: 19 October 2011 / Published: 24 October 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Petroleum Engineering)
Download PDF [2010 KB, uploaded 24 October 2011]
Abstract: This research aims at providing evidence of particle suspension contributions to emulsion stability, which has been cited as a contributing factor in crude oil recovery by low-salinity waterflooding. Kaolinite and silica particle dispersions were characterized as functions of brine salinity. A reference aqueous phase, representing reservoir brine, was used and then diluted with distilled water to obtain brines at 10 and 100 times lower Total Dissolved Solid (TDS). Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were used to examine at the morphology and composition of clays. The zeta potential and particle size distribution were also measured. Emulsions were prepared by mixing a crude oil with brine, with and without dispersed particles to investigate emulsion stability. The clay zeta potential as a function of pH was used to investigate the effect of particle charge on emulsion stability. The stability was determined through bottle tests and optical microscopy. Results show that both kaolinite and silica promote emulsion stability. Also, kaolinite, roughly 1 mm in size, stabilizes emulsions better than larger clay particles. Silica particles of larger size (5 µm) yielded more stable emulsions than smaller silica particles do. Test results show that clay particles with zero point of charge (ZPC) at low pH become less effective at stabilizing emulsions, while silica stabilizes emulsions better at ZPC. These result shed light on emulsion stabilization in low-salinity waterflooding.
Keywords: pickering emulsions; particle dispersion; water-in-oil emulsions; low salinity; EOR pickering emulsions; particle dispersion; water-in-oil emulsions; low salinity; EOR
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, X.; Alvarado, V. Kaolinite and Silica Dispersions in Low-Salinity Environments: Impact on a Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Stability. Energies 2011, 4, 1763-1778.

AMA Style

Wang X, Alvarado V. Kaolinite and Silica Dispersions in Low-Salinity Environments: Impact on a Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Stability. Energies. 2011; 4(10):1763-1778.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Xiuyu; Alvarado, Vladimir. 2011. "Kaolinite and Silica Dispersions in Low-Salinity Environments: Impact on a Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Stability." Energies 4, no. 10: 1763-1778.


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