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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2012, 9(9), 3115-3133; doi:10.3390/ijerph9093115
Article

Assessing Disaster Preparedness among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in Eastern North Carolina

1,* , 2
 and 3
Received: 9 July 2012; in revised form: 6 August 2012 / Accepted: 17 August 2012 / Published: 30 August 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preparedness and Emergency Response)
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Abstract: Natural disasters including hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, and fires often involve substantial physical and mental impacts on affected populations and thus are public health priorities. Limited research shows that vulnerable populations such as the low-income, socially isolated migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFW) are particularly susceptible to the effects of natural disasters. This research project assessed the awareness, perceived risk, and practices regarding disaster preparedness and response resources and identified barriers to utilization of community and government services during or after a natural disaster among Latino MSFWs’ and their families. Qualitative (N = 21) focus groups (3) and quantitative (N = 57) survey methodology was implemented with Latino MSFWs temporarily residing in rural eastern North Carolina to assess perceived and actual risk for natural disasters. Hurricanes were a top concern among the sample population, many participants shared they lacked proper resources for an emergency (no emergency kit in the house, no evacuation plan, no home internet, a lack of knowledge of what should be included in an emergency kit, etc.). Transportation and language were found to be additional barriers. Emergency broadcasts in Spanish and text message alerts were identified by the population to be helpful for disaster alerts. FEMA, American Red Cross, local schools and the migrant clinic were trusted places for assistance and information. In summary, tailored materials, emergency alerts, text messages, and news coverage concerning disaster threats should be provided in the population’s native language and when feasible delivered in a culturally appropriate mechanism such as “charlas” (talks) and brochures.
Keywords: disaster preparedness; Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers; MSFW disaster preparedness; Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers; MSFW
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Burke, S.; Bethel, J.W.; Britt, A.F. Assessing Disaster Preparedness among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in Eastern North Carolina. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2012, 9, 3115-3133.

AMA Style

Burke S, Bethel JW, Britt AF. Assessing Disaster Preparedness among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in Eastern North Carolina. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2012; 9(9):3115-3133.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Burke, Sloane; Bethel, Jeffrey W.; Britt, Amber Foreman. 2012. "Assessing Disaster Preparedness among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in Eastern North Carolina." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 9, no. 9: 3115-3133.


Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert