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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010088

The Impact of Load Carriage on Measures of Power and Agility in Tactical Occupations: A Critical Review

1
Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD 4229, Australia
2
Tactical Research Unit, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD 4229, Australia
3
Department of Health Science, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO 80918, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 December 2017 / Revised: 4 January 2018 / Accepted: 5 January 2018 / Published: 7 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
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Abstract

The current literature suggests that load carriage can impact on a tactical officer’s mobility, and that survival in the field may rely on the officer’s mobility. The ability for humans to generate power and agility is critical for performance of the high-intensity movements required in the field of duty. The aims of this review were to critically examine the literature investigating the impacts of load carriage on measures of power and agility and to synthesize the findings. The authors completed a search of the literature using key search terms in four databases. After relevant studies were located using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, the studies were critically appraised using the Downs and Black Checklist and relevant data were extracted and tabled. Fourteen studies were deemed relevant for this review, ranging in percentage quality scores from 42.85% to 71.43%. Outcome measures used in these studies to indicate levels of power and agility included short-distance sprints, vertical jumps, and agility runs, among others. Performance of both power and agility was shown to decrease when tactical load was added to the participants. This suggests that the increase in weight carried by tactical officers may put this population at risk of injury or fatality in the line of duty. View Full-Text
Keywords: power; agility; mobility; tactical; police; law enforcement; military; load; personal protective equipment; body armour power; agility; mobility; tactical; police; law enforcement; military; load; personal protective equipment; body armour
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Joseph, A.; Wiley, A.; Orr, R.; Schram, B.; Dawes, J.J. The Impact of Load Carriage on Measures of Power and Agility in Tactical Occupations: A Critical Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 88.

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