Next Article in Journal
Living with Smoker(s) and Smoking Cessation in Chinese Adult Smokers: Cross-Sectional and Prospective Evidence from Hong Kong Population Health Survey
Next Article in Special Issue
A Qualitative Study of HR/OHS Stress Interventions in Australian Universities
Previous Article in Journal
Attitudes towards Potential New Tobacco Control Regulations among U.S. Adults
Previous Article in Special Issue
Is Job Control a Double-Edged Sword? A Cross-Lagged Panel Study on the Interplay of Quantitative Workload, Emotional Dissonance, and Job Control on Emotional Exhaustion
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010073

Workaholism as a Mediator between Work-Related Stressors and Health Outcomes

1
Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
2
Department of Psychosocial Science, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 December 2017 / Revised: 30 December 2017 / Accepted: 2 January 2018 / Published: 5 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work Stress and the Development of Chronic Diseases)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [306 KB, uploaded 5 January 2018]

Abstract

It is currently unknown if unfavorable working conditions, reflected by the demand–control–support model and the effort–reward imbalance model, directly influence health or if the effects may be mediated by work-related attitudes and behaviors such as workaholism. In the present study, 988 employees (55.6% males, mean age 36.09, SD = 9.23) from a large consultant firm participated in a cross-sectional survey assessing work variables such as job demands, job control, social support, effort, reward, and overcommitment. Workaholism was also assessed together with eight different health-related outcomes. Although direct effects of the work stressors on health were found on most health outcomes, the work-related stressors were overall strongly related to workaholism (R2 = 0.522), which, in turn, was positively related to four (anxiety/insomnia, somatic symptoms, emotional exhaustion, and social dysfunction) of the eight outcome variables. Of a total of 40 relationships between work-related stressors and health outcomes, workaholism fully mediated three of these, and partly mediated 12. Overall, the study suggests that the effects of work-related stressors on health in many cases may be mediated by workaholism. View Full-Text
Keywords: workaholism; job demand–control–social support; effort–reward imbalance; burnout; insomnia; general health workaholism; job demand–control–social support; effort–reward imbalance; burnout; insomnia; general health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Andreassen, C.S.; Pallesen, S.; Torsheim, T. Workaholism as a Mediator between Work-Related Stressors and Health Outcomes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 73.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top