Next Article in Journal
Green Space and Depression during Pregnancy: Results from the Growing Up in New Zealand Study
Previous Article in Journal
Linguistic Multi-Attribute Group Decision Making with Risk Preferences and Its Use in Low-Carbon Tourism Destination Selection
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1080; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091080

Depression and Risk of Unintentional Injury in Rural Communities—A Longitudinal Analysis of the Australian Rural Mental Health Study

1
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, NSW 2305, Australia
3
Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
5
Hunter New England Mental Health, Newcastle, NSW 2300, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sharon Lawn
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 13 September 2017 / Accepted: 15 September 2017 / Published: 18 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Full-Text   |   PDF [336 KB, uploaded 18 September 2017]

Abstract

Limited longitudinal research has examined relationships between depression and injury, particularly in rural contexts. This paper reports cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses from the Australian Rural Mental Health Study (ARMHS) exploring relationships between “probable depression” episodes and unintentional injury. Participants completed four surveys over five years. Multivariate logistic regressions were employed to assess the causal effect of prior depression episodes on subsequent injury risk. Of 2621 baseline participants, 23.3% experienced a probable depression episode recently and 15.9% reported a serious injury during the previous 12 months. Factors associated with a 12-month injury at baseline included male gender, being unemployed or unable to work, being involved in a serious incident, hazardous alcohol use, and having experienced a recent depression episode. Longitudinal analyses revealed that probable depression was significantly associated with subsequent unintentional injury (OR 1.68, 99%CI 1.20–2.35), as was male gender (OR 1.39, 99%CI 1.06–1.82), while alcohol consumption did not mediate these relationships. Campaigns to reduce the impact of mental illness should consider unintentional injuries as a contributor, while injury prevention initiatives may benefit from addressing mental health issues. Such strategies are particularly important in rural and remote areas where injuries are more common and mental health services are less readily available. View Full-Text
Keywords: injury; depression; affective disorder; rural mental health; risk factors; longitudinal analysis injury; depression; affective disorder; rural mental health; risk factors; longitudinal analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Inder, K.J.; Holliday, E.G.; Handley, T.E.; Fragar, L.J.; Lower, T.; Booth, A.; Lewin, T.J.; Kelly, B.J. Depression and Risk of Unintentional Injury in Rural Communities—A Longitudinal Analysis of the Australian Rural Mental Health Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1080.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top