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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1014; doi:10.3390/ijerph14091014

Active Transportation on a Complete Street: Perceived and Audited Walkability Correlates

1
Department of Family & Consumer Studies, University of Utah, 225 S 1400 E RM 228, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
2
Department of Family & Consumer Studies and Cancer Control & Population Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, 225 S 1400 E RM 228, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
3
Department of Geography, University of Utah, 332 S 1400 E RM 217, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
4
Department of Psychology, Westminster College, 1840 S 1300 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84105, USA
5
Utah Department of Health, 288 N 1460 W, Salt Lake City, UT 84116, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Norbert Mundorf and Colleen A. Redding
Received: 8 July 2017 / Revised: 23 August 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 5 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transportation and Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1044 KB, uploaded 5 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Few studies of walkability include both perceived and audited walkability measures. We examined perceived walkability (Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale—Abbreviated, NEWS-A) and audited walkability (Irvine–Minnesota Inventory, IMI) measures for residents living within 2 km of a “complete street”—one renovated with light rail, bike lanes, and sidewalks. For perceived walkability, we found some differences but substantial similarity between our final scales and those in a prior published confirmatory factor analysis. Perceived walkability, in interaction with distance, was related to complete street active transportation. Residents were likely to have active transportation on the street when they lived nearby and perceived good aesthetics, crime safety, and traffic safety. Audited walkability, analyzed with decision trees, showed three general clusters of walkability areas, with 12 specific subtypes. A subset of walkability items (n = 11), including sidewalks, zebra-striped crosswalks, decorative sidewalks, pedestrian signals, and blank walls combined to cluster street segments. The 12 subtypes yielded 81% correct classification of residents’ active transportation. Both perceived and audited walkability were important predictors of active transportation. For audited walkability, we recommend more exploration of decision tree approaches, given their predictive utility and ease of translation into walkability interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: audited walkability; perceived walkability; complete street; physical activity; active travel; accelerometer; global positioning system audited walkability; perceived walkability; complete street; physical activity; active travel; accelerometer; global positioning system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jensen, W.A.; Brown, B.B.; Smith, K.R.; Brewer, S.C.; Amburgey, J.W.; McIff, B. Active Transportation on a Complete Street: Perceived and Audited Walkability Correlates. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1014.

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