Next Article in Journal
Health Risks and Contamination Levels of Heavy Metals in Dusts from Parks and Squares of an Industrial City in Semi-Arid Area of China
Previous Article in Journal
Predicting Urban Medical Services Demand in China: An Improved Grey Markov Chain Model by Taylor Approximation
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(8), 884; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080884

Is Living near Healthier Food Stores Associated with Better Food Intake in Regional Australia?

1
School of Health and Society, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
2
Early Start Research Institute, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
3
Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
4
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
5
Westmead Hospital, Western Sydney Local Health District, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 June 2017 / Revised: 4 August 2017 / Accepted: 5 August 2017 / Published: 7 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [287 KB, uploaded 7 August 2017]

Abstract

High prevalence of obesity and non-communicable diseases is a global public health problem, in which the quality of food environments is thought to play an important role. Current scientific evidence is not consistent regarding the impact of food environments on diet. The relationship between local food environments and diet quality was assessed across 10 Australian suburbs, using Australian-based indices devised to measure the two parameters. Data of dietary habits from the participants was gathered using a short questionnaire. The suburbs’ Food Environment Score (higher being healthier) was associated with higher consumption of fruit (χ2 (40, 230) = 58.8, p = 0.04), and vegetables (χ2 (40, 230) = 81.3, p = 0.03). The Food Environment Score identified a significant positive correlation with four of the diet scores: individual total diet score (rs = 0.30, p < 0.01), fruit and vegetable score (rs = 0.43, p < 0.01), sugary drink score (rs = 0.13, p < 0.05), and discretionary food score (rs = 0.15, p < 0.05). Moreover, the suburbs’ RFEI (Retail Food Environment Index, higher being unhealthier) showed a significant association with higher consumption of salty snacks (χ2 (24, 230) = 43.9, p = 0.04). Food environments dominated by food outlets considered as ‘healthier’ were associated with healthier population food intakes, as indicated by a higher consumption of fruit, vegetables, and water, as well as a lower consumption of junk food, salty snacks, and sugary drinks. This association suggests that healthier diet quality is associated with healthier food environments in regional Australia. View Full-Text
Keywords: food environment; diet quality; food score; obesity food environment; diet quality; food score; obesity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Moayyed, H.; Kelly, B.; Feng, X.; Flood, V. Is Living near Healthier Food Stores Associated with Better Food Intake in Regional Australia? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 884.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top