Next Article in Journal
In Vitro and In Vivo Control of Secondary Bacterial Infection Caused by Leishmania major
Next Article in Special Issue
Physiological Effects of Touching Wood
Previous Article in Journal
Biodegradable and Petroleum-Based Microplastics Do Not Differ in Their Ingestion and Excretion but in Their Biological Effects in a Freshwater Invertebrate Gammarus fossarum
Previous Article in Special Issue
Physical and Emotional Benefits of Different Exercise Environments Designed for Treadmill Running
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 773; doi:10.3390/ijerph14070773

Physiological Effects of Touching Coated Wood

1
Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, 1 Matsunosato, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687, Japan
2
Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, Chiba University, 6-2-1 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0882, Japan
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 22 June 2017 / Revised: 7 July 2017 / Accepted: 10 July 2017 / Published: 13 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Nature Therapy: Advances in Physiological Evaluation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2948 KB, uploaded 13 July 2017]   |  

Abstract

This study examined the physiological effects of touching wood with various coating with the palm of the hand on brain activity and autonomic nervous activity. Participants were 18 female university students (mean age, 21.7 ± 1.6 years). As an indicator of brain activity, oxyhemoglobin concentrations were measured in the left and right prefrontal cortices using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate were used as indicators of autonomic nervous activity. The high-frequency (HF) component of HRV, which reflects parasympathetic nervous activity, and the low-frequency (LF)/HF ratio, which reflects sympathetic nervous activity, were measured. Plates of uncoated, oil-finished, vitreous-finished, urethane-finished, and mirror-finished white oak wood were used as tactile stimuli. After sitting at rest with their eyes closed for 60 s, participants touched the stimuli with their palm for 90 s each. The results indicated that tactile stimulation with uncoated wood calmed prefrontal cortex activity (vs. urethane finish and mirror finish), increased parasympathetic nervous activity (vs. vitreous finish, urethane finish, and mirror finish), and decreased heart rate (vs. mirror finish), demonstrating a physiological relaxation effect. Further, tactile stimulation with oil- and vitreous-finished wood calmed left prefrontal cortex activity and decreased heart rate relative to mirror-finished wood. View Full-Text
Keywords: coated wood; tactile; autonomic nervous activity; prefrontal cortex activity; heart rate variability; heart rate; near-infrared spectroscopy; semantic differential method; physiological relaxation; preventive medical effect coated wood; tactile; autonomic nervous activity; prefrontal cortex activity; heart rate variability; heart rate; near-infrared spectroscopy; semantic differential method; physiological relaxation; preventive medical effect
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ikei, H.; Song, C.; Miyazaki, Y. Physiological Effects of Touching Coated Wood. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 773.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top