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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 677; doi:10.3390/ijerph14070677

Benefits, Facilitators, Barriers, and Strategies to Improve Pesticide Protective Behaviors: Insights from Farmworkers in North Carolina Tobacco Fields

1
School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
2
Department of Applied Ecology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
3
Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
4
College of Nursing, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: William A. Toscano
Received: 11 May 2017 / Revised: 12 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 23 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [287 KB, uploaded 23 June 2017]

Abstract

Pesticide exposure is associated with deleterious health effects. Prior studies suggest Latino farmworkers perceive little control over their occupational health. Using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical guide, we explored the perceptions of Latino farmworkers working in tobacco in North Carolina (n = 72) about benefits and facilitators of pesticide protective behaviors as well as barriers, and strategies to overcome barriers to their use. Interviews were conducted with participants at farmworker housing during non-work time. Qualitative data were analyzed using ATLAS.ti. Farmworkers recognized pesticide protective behaviors as helping them to not get sick and stay healthy. Farmworkers perceived work experience as facilitating protective behaviors. Wetness in the field was the most commonly cited barrier to protective behavior use. To overcome this barrier, farmworkers suggested use of water-resistant outerwear, as well as packing a change of clothes for mid-day, with space and time to change provided by employers. Examination of the efficacy and feasibility of farmworkers’ suggestions for addressing barriers is warranted. Training and behavior modeling by experienced peers may improve behavior adoption and perceived control. View Full-Text
Keywords: pesticide protective behaviors; Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers; benefits of protective behavior; facilitators of protective behavior; barriers to protective behavior; strategies to improve protective behavior; tobacco pesticide protective behaviors; Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers; benefits of protective behavior; facilitators of protective behavior; barriers to protective behavior; strategies to improve protective behavior; tobacco
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Walton, A.L.; LePrevost, C.E.; Linnan, L.; Sanchez-Birkhead, A.; Mooney, K. Benefits, Facilitators, Barriers, and Strategies to Improve Pesticide Protective Behaviors: Insights from Farmworkers in North Carolina Tobacco Fields. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 677.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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