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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(6), 651; doi:10.3390/ijerph14060651

Lower Physical Performance in Colder Seasons and Colder Houses: Evidence from a Field Study on Older People Living in the Community

1
School of Science for Open and Environmental Systems, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3 14 1, Kohoku, Yokohama 2238522, Japan
2
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, Lund 22100, Sweden
3
Department of Urban Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1 1, Hachioji, Tokyo 1920397, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Philippa Howden-Chapman
Received: 15 April 2017 / Revised: 14 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 17 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Housing and Health)
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Abstract

The aim of this paper was to explore the effect of seasonal temperature differences and cold indoor environment in winter on the physical performance of older people living in the community based on a field study. We recruited 162 home-dwelling older people from a rehabilitation facility in the Osaka prefecture, Japan; physical performance data were available from 98/162 (60.5%). At the same time, for some participants, a questionnaire survey and a measurement of the indoor temperature of individual houses were conducted. The analysis showed that there were seasonal trends in the physical performance of older people and that physical performance was worse in the winter compared with the autumn. Furthermore, people living in colder houses had worse physical performance. The findings indicate that keeping the house warm in the winter can help to maintain physical performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor thermal environment; field study; frail; physical strength examination indoor thermal environment; field study; frail; physical strength examination
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Hayashi, Y.; Schmidt, S.M.; Malmgren Fänge, A.; Hoshi, T.; Ikaga, T. Lower Physical Performance in Colder Seasons and Colder Houses: Evidence from a Field Study on Older People Living in the Community. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 651.

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