Next Article in Journal
Infectious Diseases and Tropical Cyclones in Southeast China
Next Article in Special Issue
Sleep Duration, Sleep Quality, Body Mass Index, and Waist Circumference among Young Adults from 24 Low- and Middle-Income and Two High-Income Countries
Previous Article in Journal
Perception, Knowledge and Behaviors Related to Typhoon: A Cross Sectional Study among Rural Residents in Zhejiang, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Association between Sleep and Body Weight: A Panel Data Model Based on a Retrospective Longitudinal Cohort of Chinese Infants
Article Menu
Issue 5 (May) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(5), 493; doi:10.3390/ijerph14050493

Beverage Intake, Smoking Behavior, and Alcohol Consumption in Contemporary China—A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the 2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey

1
School of Public Health, Department of Applied Health Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
2
College of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
3
School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02118, USA
Current email address: leeyen@umail.iu.edu.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Youfa Wang
Received: 25 February 2017 / Revised: 2 May 2017 / Accepted: 5 May 2017 / Published: 7 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behavior and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [314 KB, uploaded 17 May 2017]

Abstract

Chinese residents enjoy various types of beverages in their daily life. With the rapid Westernization of contemporary China, several adverse health concerns—such as diabetes linked to sweetened beverages—have emerged. Until now, no research that examines associations between beverage consumption and smoking/drinking behaviors has been made available, despite the large Chinese populations partaking in such activities. We conducted a cross-sectional study to explore the association between beverage intake frequencies and smoking/drinking behaviors in 12,634 adult respondents who participated in the latest wave (2011) of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). Further, we applied Tukey’s Honest Significance test for pairwise comparisons. We defined the consumption categories as daily (at least one serving per day), weekly (less than one serving per day, at least one serving per week), monthly (less than one serving per week, at least one serving per month), and less than monthly or none—for sweetened beverage, water, tea, and coffee consumptions. The data showed that both tea and sweetened beverages are associated with smoking/drinking behaviors. Compared to respondents who consume tea and sweetened beverages daily, the odds of smoking behaviors are lower for those who consume such beverages less frequently. Further policy implications are discussed, including higher taxes on sweetened beverages and lessons from other countries. View Full-Text
Keywords: China; beverage intake; smoking; alcohol consumption; Westernization; health behavior China; beverage intake; smoking; alcohol consumption; Westernization; health behavior
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, Y.-H.; Wang, Z.; Chiang, T.C.; Liu, C.-T. Beverage Intake, Smoking Behavior, and Alcohol Consumption in Contemporary China—A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the 2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 493.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top