Next Article in Journal
Requalification of a Brazilian Trichoderma Collection and Screening of Its Capability to Decolourise Real Textile Effluent
Previous Article in Journal
A Risk Assessment Matrix for Public Health Principles: The Case for E-Cigarettes
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessCommunication
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 369; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040369

Time Trend and Demographic and Geographic Disparities in Childhood Obesity Prevalence in China—Evidence from Twenty Years of Longitudinal Data

1
Department of Earth Observation Science, Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, Enschede 7500, The Netherlands
2
Fisher Institute of Health and Well-Being, Systems-Oriented Global Childhood Obesity Intervention Program, College of Health, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306, USA
3
National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100000, China
4
Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Health, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 February 2017 / Revised: 16 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1219 KB, uploaded 5 April 2017]   |  

Abstract

Childhood overweight and obesity (ow/ob) has become a serious threat to many countries, including China. However, limited evidence was obtained from longitudinal data in China. This study examined the secular trends and geographic variation in the prevalence of ow/ob and obesity only, and age, gender, and urban-rural disparities among school-aged children across China. Data from children aged 6–17 surveyed in China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) from 1991 (n = 2712) to 2011 (n = 1054) were used. Overweight and obesity were defined based on the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) recommended Asian age-sex-specific BMI cut-off-points. We found that: (1) childhood ow/ob and obesity prevalence increased from 11.7% to 25.2% and from 2.8% to 10.1% during 1991–2011, respectively; (2) children aged 6–12 experienced a 1.3 and 1.6 times increase in ow/ob and obesity prevalence than children aged 13–17, respectively; (3) the urban-rural gap in ow/ob prevalence widened; (4) ow/ob prevalence in boys was higher and increased faster than in girls, especially in an urban setting; and (5) geographic variation was observed with faster increases in more economically developed east, central and northeast regions than in the less developed west. The findings added more nuances to the picture of temporal changes in ow/ob prevalence among Chinese children. View Full-Text
Keywords: China; child; obesity; overweight China; child; obesity; overweight
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Jia, P.; Xue, H.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Y. Time Trend and Demographic and Geographic Disparities in Childhood Obesity Prevalence in China—Evidence from Twenty Years of Longitudinal Data. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 369.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top