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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 353; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040353

Conceptions of Contraceptive Use in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Lessons for Programming

1
Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria 0083, South Africa
2
School of Social Sciences (Sociology), University of KwaZulu-Natal, KwaZulu-Natal Dalbridge 4041, South Africa
3
Department of Economics and International Business, Faculty of Business and Law, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6BH, UK
4
Graduate School of Business Leadership, University of South Africa, Midrand Johannesburg 1685, South Africa
5
School of Built Environment and Development Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal, KwaZulu-Natal Dalbridge 4041, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 November 2016 / Revised: 20 February 2017 / Accepted: 15 March 2017 / Published: 28 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [301 KB, uploaded 29 March 2017]

Abstract

Community family planning programmes in South Africa arose from the controversial apartheid history of controlling the African population while encouraging the growth of European migrant population. Post-apartheid population policies shifted away from population control to aligning policies to the global agenda that placed emphasis on the link between population and development. The focus on population and development polices in post-apartheid South Africa is on social equality, justice and peace rather than controlling sections of the population. Given the shift, this paper interrogates the conceptions of contraceptive use among rural communities in KwaZulu-Natal. Our primary objective is to understand the dynamics surrounding access to and use of family planning services in peri-urban and rural areas of KwaZulu-Natal. Using focus group data, the findings of the study suggest that different social categories interact with the family planning programmes differently. How teenagers and married women perceive the value of family planning differs. Gender differences regarding the use of condoms are also evident. The paper attempts to grapple with the non-use of condoms despite the knowledge that these prevent pregnancy and provide protection from sexually-transmitted diseases. The contribution of this paper lies in its identification of socio-cultural factors and the political economy underlying the different attitudes towards contraceptive use in rural KwaZulu-Natal. View Full-Text
Keywords: contraceptive use; sexual and reproductive health and rights; Kwazulu-Natal; focus group discussions; socio-cultural dynamics; political economy; gender contraceptive use; sexual and reproductive health and rights; Kwazulu-Natal; focus group discussions; socio-cultural dynamics; political economy; gender
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Ndinda, C.; Ndhlovu, T.; Khalema, N.E. Conceptions of Contraceptive Use in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Lessons for Programming. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 353.

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