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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 118; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020118

Understanding Resilience Dimensions and Adaptive Strategies to the Impact of Recurrent Droughts in Borana Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia: A Grounded Theory Approach

1
Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma 378, Ethiopia
2
Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma 378, Ethiopia
3
Department of Health Economics, Management and Policy, Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma 378, Ethiopia
4
Resilient Africa Network, Horn of Africa Resilience Innovation Lab, Jimma University, Jimma 378, Ethiopia
5
Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma 378, Ethiopia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peng Bi
Received: 7 November 2016 / Revised: 21 December 2016 / Accepted: 3 January 2017 / Published: 26 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [460 KB, uploaded 26 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Recurrent shocks and stresses are increasingly deteriorating pastoralist communities’ resilience capacities in many aspects. A context specific resilience framework is essential to strengthen pastoralist community’s resilience capacity towards the impact of recurrent drought. Hence, the present study was aimed to develop a context specific and data driven resilience building framework towards impacts of recurrent droughts in the case of Borana pastoralists in Ethiopia. Qualitative grounded theory approach was employed to guide the study process. The data were collected through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews in two drought affected districts of Borana Zone during October 2013. The analysis was assisted by ATLAS. ti 7.1.4. The analysis provided a context specific resilience building conceptual tool, which consists of, closely interconnected, eight dimensions operating at multiple capacities and levels: environment (underlying vulnerability factor); livestock, infrastructures/social services, and wealth (immediate causes and effects); community network/social capital, as well as governance, peace and security (support and enabling factors oriented), psychosocial, and human capital (as eventual outcomes and impacts). The resilience capacities of these pastoralist communities have been eroded, leaving them without sufficient and effective adaptive strategies. The emergent resilience framework can serve as a useful guidance to design context-specific interventions that makes the people and the system resilient to the impacts of recurrent droughts. View Full-Text
Keywords: resilience; recurrent droughts; disasters; shocks; adaptive capacity; coping strategies; pastoralists; Borana; Ethiopia resilience; recurrent droughts; disasters; shocks; adaptive capacity; coping strategies; pastoralists; Borana; Ethiopia
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Birhanu, Z.; Ambelu, A.; Berhanu, N.; Tesfaye, A.; Woldemichael, K. Understanding Resilience Dimensions and Adaptive Strategies to the Impact of Recurrent Droughts in Borana Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia: A Grounded Theory Approach. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 118.

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