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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1382; doi:10.3390/ijerph14111382

Establishing Smoke-Free Homes in the Indigenous Populations of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States: A Systematic Literature Review

1
College of Public Health, Medicine and Veterinary Science, James Cook University, Cairns 4870, Australia
2
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns 4870, Australia
3
School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2300, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 September 2017 / Revised: 5 November 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 14 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development and Evaluation of New Tobacco Control Interventions)
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Abstract

A smoke-free home can have multiple benefits by reducing exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS), supporting quit attempts among active smokers, and discouraging adolescents from taking up smoking. The aim of this review was to summarize the literature on the establishment of smoke-free homes in Indigenous populations and identify the supporting influences and barriers, using the Social Cognitive Theory lens. A search of the Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Collaboration and PyscINFO databases and manual searches of relevant peer-reviewed literature was completed, focusing on Indigenous populations in developed economies of North America and Oceania. Of 2567 articles identified, 15 studies were included. Ten studies included Indigenous participants only, and of these just three focused entirely on SHS in the home. Knowledge of the harms associated with SHS was the most common theme represented in all the studies. This knowledge fueled parents’ motivation to protect their children from SHS by establishing smoke-free homes. Individuals who approached implementation with confidence, coupled with clear communication about smoke-free home rules were more successful. Barriers included challenges for families with multiple smokers living in the same dwelling. There is limited research regarding managing smoking behaviors in the home among Indigenous populations, even though this approach is a successful catalyst for smoking prevention and cessation. Research to understand the influences that support the establishment of smoke-free homes is required for better-informed intervention studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indigenous populations; smoke-free homes; second-hand smoke; tobacco prevention; Oceania; America Indigenous populations; smoke-free homes; second-hand smoke; tobacco prevention; Oceania; America
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Stevenson, L.; Campbell, S.; Bohanna, I.; Gould, G.S.; Robertson, J.; Clough, A.R. Establishing Smoke-Free Homes in the Indigenous Populations of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States: A Systematic Literature Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1382.

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