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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1300; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111300

Nutrient Content and Nutritional Water Productivity of Selected Grain Legumes in Response to Production Environment

Crop Science, School of Agricultural, Earth and Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture, Engineering and Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville 3201 Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 26 September 2017 / Revised: 23 October 2017 / Accepted: 24 October 2017 / Published: 26 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
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Abstract

There is a need to incorporate nutrition into aspects of crop and water productivity to tackle food and nutrition insecurity (FNS). The study determined the nutritional water productivity (NWP) of selected major (groundnut, dry bean) and indigenous (bambara groundnut and cowpea) grain legumes in response to water regimes and environments. Field trials were conducted during 2015/16 and 2016/17 at three sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (Ukulinga, Fountainhill and Umbumbulu). Yield and evapotranspiration (ET) data were collected. Grain was analysed for protein, fat, Ca, Fe and Zn nutrient content (NC). Yield, ET and NC were then used to compute NWP. Overall, the major legumes performed better than the indigenous grain legumes. Groundnut had the highest NWPfat. Groundnut and dry bean had the highest NWPprotein. For NWPFe, Zn and Ca, dry bean and cowpea were more productive. Yield instability caused fluctuations in NWP. Water treatments were not significant (p > 0.05). While there is scope to improve NWP under rainfed conditions, a lack of crop improvement currently limits the potential of indigenous grain legumes. This provides an initial insight on the nutrient content and NWP of a limited number of selected grain legumes in response to the production environment. There is a need for follow-up research to include cowpea data. Future studies should provide more experimental data and explore effects of additional factors such as management practices (fertiliser levels and plant density), climate and edaphic factors on nutrient content and NWP of crops. View Full-Text
Keywords: groundnut; dry bean; cowpea; bambara groundnut; groundnut; food and nutrition insecurity; yield; evapotranspiration groundnut; dry bean; cowpea; bambara groundnut; groundnut; food and nutrition insecurity; yield; evapotranspiration
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Chibarabada, T.P.; Modi, A.T.; Mabhaudhi, T. Nutrient Content and Nutritional Water Productivity of Selected Grain Legumes in Response to Production Environment. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1300.

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