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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 97; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010097

Essential Oil of Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) Wood Increases Salivary Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels after Monotonous Work

Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, 1 Matsunosato, Tsukuba 305-8687, Japan
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: William A. Toscano
Received: 4 November 2016 / Revised: 10 January 2017 / Accepted: 16 January 2017 / Published: 21 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
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Abstract

Employee problems arising from mental illnesses have steadily increased and become a serious social problem in recent years. Wood is a widely available plant material, and knowledge of the psychophysiological effects of inhalation of woody volatile compounds has grown considerably. In this study, we established an experimental method to evaluate the effects of Japanese cedar wood essential oil on subjects performing monotonous work. Two experiment conditions, one with and another without diffusion of the essential oil were prepared. Salivary stress markers were determined during and after a calculation task followed by distribution of questionnaires to achieve subjective odor assessment. We found that inhalation of air containing the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil increased the secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s). Slight differences in the subjective assessment of the odor of the experiment rooms were observed. The results of the present study indicate that the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil affect the endocrine regulatory mechanism to facilitate stress responses. Thus, we suggest that this essential oil can improve employees’ mental health. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cryptomeria japonica; wood; essential oil; salivary biomarkers; DHEA-s Cryptomeria japonica; wood; essential oil; salivary biomarkers; DHEA-s
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Matsubara, E.; Tsunetsugu, Y.; Ohira, T.; Sugiyama, M. Essential Oil of Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) Wood Increases Salivary Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels after Monotonous Work. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 97.

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