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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 86; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010086

Self-Reported Snoring Is Associated with Dyslipidemia, High Total Cholesterol, and High Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Obesity: A Cross-Sectional Study from a Rural Area of China

Department of Cardiology, the First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Clifton
Received: 18 November 2016 / Revised: 11 January 2017 / Accepted: 12 January 2017 / Published: 17 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [294 KB, uploaded 17 January 2017]

Abstract

Studies to explore the relationship between self-reported snoring and dyslipidemia, especially high total cholesterol (TC) and high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), in the general population are still lacking. Our study was designed to examine whether self-reported snoring is significantly associated with dyslipidemia and ascertain the effects of different snoring intensities on dyslipidemia. There were 10,139 participants in our study. After adjustment for all confounding factors, self-reported snoring (OR = 1.207; p = 0.003), moderate (OR = 1.229; p = 0.015), strong (OR = 1.222; p = 0.033), and very strong (OR = 1.467; p = 0.012) snoring intensity, but not low (OR = 1.110; p = 0.224) snoring intensity, were significantly associated with dyslipidemia among adults with BMI (body mass index) ≥ 25 kg/m2. In addition, self-reported snoring was significantly associated with high TC (OR = 1.167; p = 0.048) and high LDL-C (OR = 1.228; p = 0.044), rather than low HDL-C (OR = 1.171; p = 0.057) and high triglyceride (TG) (OR = 1.110; p = 0.141). In conclusion, adults with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and who experience snoring, especially moderate, strong, and very strong intensity levels of snoring, should be on the alert regarding the possibility of dyslipidemia, especially high LDL-C and high TC. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-reported snoring; dyslipidemia; high TC; high LDL-C self-reported snoring; dyslipidemia; high TC; high LDL-C
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, N.; Chen, Y.; Chen, S.; Jia, P.; Guo, X.; Sun, G.; Sun, Y. Self-Reported Snoring Is Associated with Dyslipidemia, High Total Cholesterol, and High Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Obesity: A Cross-Sectional Study from a Rural Area of China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 86.

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