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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(9), 893; doi:10.3390/ijerph13090893

Household Air Pollution Intervention Implications: Findings from Qualitative Studies and a Field Trial of Clean Cookstoves in Two Rural Villages in India

1
Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
2
Lata Medical Research Foundation, Nagpur 440022, Maharashtra, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 3 May 2016 / Revised: 13 July 2016 / Accepted: 16 August 2016 / Published: 9 September 2016
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Abstract

Exposure to household air pollution is estimated to be the 3rd largest contributor to the global burden of disease and the largest contributor in South Asia. Unacceptability of improved cook stoves by the intended user has been identified as a crucial factor hindering uptake and sustained use. We conducted a qualitative study to understand the socio-cultural factors that influence acceptance of improved cookstoves and conducted a systematic field trial in two rural villages in Maharashtra, India. The qualitative study used semi-structured in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. We included women primarily responsible for household cooking, their husbands, senior women in their households, and community health workers. We also conducted kitchen observations. The results indicated low awareness and knowledge of the health risks associated with traditional cookstove use although high prevalence of household air pollution (HAP) exposure symptoms among all groups. Women were resigned to using traditional cookstoves although they did not like them. The field trial findings were dominated by responses concerned with convenience and health advantages. We identify important issues to be considered when introducing an improved cookstove programme that will increase acceptability and potentially sustained used of improved cookstoves. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; focus groups; cooking; family characteristics; Asia; India air pollution; focus groups; cooking; family characteristics; Asia; India
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Alam, A.; Tawale, N.; Patel, A.; Dibley, M.J.; Jadhao, S.; Raynes-Greenow, C. Household Air Pollution Intervention Implications: Findings from Qualitative Studies and a Field Trial of Clean Cookstoves in Two Rural Villages in India. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 893.

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