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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(7), 718; doi:10.3390/ijerph13070718

Childhood Injuries in Singapore: Can Local Physicians and the Healthcare System Do More to Confront This Public Health Concern?

Department of Family Medicine, Sengkang Health, Alexandra Hospital, 378 Alexandra Road, Singapore 159964, Singapore
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 15 April 2016 / Revised: 3 June 2016 / Accepted: 8 July 2016 / Published: 16 July 2016
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Abstract

Childhood injury is one of the leading causes of death globally. Singapore is no exception to this tragic fact, with childhood injuries accounting up to 37% of Emergency Department visits. Hence, it is important to understand the epidemiology and risk factors of childhood injuries locally. A search for relevant articles published from 1996–2016 was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar using keywords relating to childhood injury in Singapore. The epidemiology, mechanisms of injury, risk factors and recommended prevention strategies of unintentional childhood injuries were reviewed and described. Epidemiological studies have shown that childhood injury is a common, preventable and significant public health concern in Singapore. Home injuries and falls are responsible for majority of the injuries. Injuries related to childcare products, playground and road traffic accidents are also important causes. Healthcare professionals and legislators play an important role in raising awareness and reducing the incidence of childhood injuries in Singapore. For example, despite legislative requirements for many years, the low usage of child restraint seats in Singapore is worrisome. Thus, greater efforts in public health education in understanding childhood injuries, coupled with more research studies to evaluate the effectiveness and deficiencies of current prevention strategies will be necessary. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood injuries; emergency visits; Singapore; preventable accidents; prevention strategies childhood injuries; emergency visits; Singapore; preventable accidents; prevention strategies
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ong, A.C.W.; Low, S.G.; Vasanwala, F.F. Childhood Injuries in Singapore: Can Local Physicians and the Healthcare System Do More to Confront This Public Health Concern? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 718.

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