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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(7), 673; doi:10.3390/ijerph13070673

Economic Burden of Hospitalization Due to Injuries in North India: A Cohort Study

1
School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India
2
The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney 2000, Australia
3
Department of Orthopaedics, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India
4
Health Economics and Social Policy Group, School of Health Sciences, The University of South Australia, South Australia 5000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ulf-G. Gerdtham
Received: 24 February 2016 / Revised: 23 June 2016 / Accepted: 27 June 2016 / Published: 2 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Health Services and Health Economics Research)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [432 KB, uploaded 2 July 2016]   |  

Abstract

There is little documentation of the potential catastrophic effects of injuries on families due to out of pocket (OOP) expenditure for medical care. Patients who were admitted for at least one night in a tertiary care hospital of Chandigarh city due to injury were recruited and were followed-up at 1, 2 and 12 months after discharge to collect information on OOP expenditure. Out of the total 227 patients, 60% (137/227) had sustained road traffic injuries (RTI). The average OOP expenditure per hospitalisation and up to 12 months post discharge was USD 388 (95% CI: 332–441) and USD 1046 (95% CI: 871–1221) respectively. Mean OOP expenditure for RTI and non-RTI cases during hospitalisation was USD 400 (95% CI: 344–456) and USD 369 (95% CI: 313–425) respectively. The prevalence of catastrophic expenditure was 30%, and was significantly higher among those belonging to the lowest income quartile (OR-26.50, 95% CI: 6.70–105.07, p-value: <0.01) and with an inpatient stay greater than 7 days (OR-10.60, 95% CI: 4.21–26.64, p-value: <0.01). High OOP expenditure for treatment of injury puts a significant economic burden on families. Measures aimed at increasing public health spending for prevention of injury and providing financial risk protection are urgently required in India. View Full-Text
Keywords: injury; out of pocket expenditure (OOP); catastrophic expenditure; distress financing injury; out of pocket expenditure (OOP); catastrophic expenditure; distress financing
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Prinja, S.; Jagnoor, J.; Chauhan, A.S.; Aggarwal, S.; Nguyen, H.; Ivers, R. Economic Burden of Hospitalization Due to Injuries in North India: A Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 673.

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