Next Article in Journal
Types of Obesity and Its Association with the Clustering of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Jilin Province of China
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Challenges in the Accurate Surveillance of Booster Seat and Bicycle Helmet Usage by Children: Lessons from the Field
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(7), 668; doi:10.3390/ijerph13070668

The Incidence and Types of Physical Contact Associated with Body Checking Regulation Experience in 13–14 Year Old Ice Hockey Players

1
Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, Laval University, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
3
Québec Public Health Institute, Québec, QC G1V 5B3, Canada
4
Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
5
Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada
6
Department of Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ian Pike and Alison Macpherson
Received: 25 April 2016 / Revised: 24 June 2016 / Accepted: 29 June 2016 / Published: 7 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Injury Prevention 2015)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [522 KB, uploaded 7 July 2016]   |  

Abstract

Background: Ice hockey has one of the highest sport participation and injury rates in youth in Canada. Body checking (BC) is the predominant mechanism of injury in leagues in which it is permitted. The objectives of this study were to determine whether the incidence and types of physical contact differ for Bantam players (aged 13–14 years) who were exposed to BC at Pee Wee level (aged 11–12 years) in Calgary, Alberta versus Bantam players who were not exposed to BC at Pee Wee level in Québec City, Québec. All teams were exposed to BC at bantam level; Methods: A cohort study was conducted in Québec City and Calgary. Sixteen games for Calgary and 15 for Québec City were randomly selected and analysed with a validated observation system to quantify five intensities of physical contact and to observe different types of physical contact such as slashing and holding; Results: A total of 5610 incidences of physical contact with the trunk and 3429 other types of physical contact were observed. Very light intensity trunk contact was more frequent in Calgary (adjusted incidence RR (ARR): 1.71; 95% CI: 1.28–2.29). Holding (ARR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.02–1.07) and slashing (ARR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.07–1.77) were more frequent in Calgary; Conclusion: Results suggest that players’ physical contacts differ between Bantam leagues in which BC was permitted at Pee Wee level and leagues in which it was not permitted until Bantam level. View Full-Text
Keywords: ice hockey; behaviours; physical contact; body checking; prevention; athletic injuries ice hockey; behaviours; physical contact; body checking; prevention; athletic injuries
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Goulet, C.; Roy, T.-O.; Nadeau, L.; Hamel, D.; Fortier, K.; Emery, C.A. The Incidence and Types of Physical Contact Associated with Body Checking Regulation Experience in 13–14 Year Old Ice Hockey Players. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 668.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top