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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(7), 654; doi:10.3390/ijerph13070654

The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries

1
Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety—Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland 4059, Australia
2
National Centre for Health Information Research & Training, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland 4059, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ian Pike and Alison Macpherson
Received: 26 February 2016 / Revised: 1 April 2016 / Accepted: 5 April 2016 / Published: 7 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Injury Prevention 2015)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [258 KB, uploaded 7 July 2016]

Abstract

A challenge in utilising health sector injury data for Product Safety purposes is that clinically coded data have limited ability to inform regulators about product involvement in injury events, given data entry is bound by a predefined set of codes. Text narratives collected in emergency departments can potentially address this limitation by providing relevant product information with additional accompanying context. This study aims to identify and quantify consumer product involvement in paediatric injuries recorded in emergency department-based injury surveillance data. A total of 7743 paediatric injuries were randomly selected from Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit database and associated text narratives were manually reviewed to determine product involvement in the injury event. A Product Involvement Factor classification system was used to categorise these injury cases. Overall, 44% of all reviewed cases were associated with consumer products, with proximity factor (25%) being identified as the most common involvement of a product in an injury event. Only 6% were established as being directly due to the product. The study highlights the importance of utilising injury data to inform product safety initiatives where text narratives can be used to identify the type and involvement of products in injury cases. View Full-Text
Keywords: paediatric injury; injury surveillance; injury data; product-related injury paediatric injury; injury surveillance; injury data; product-related injury
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Catchpoole, J.; Walker, S.; Vallmuur, K. The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 654.

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