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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(5), 455; doi:10.3390/ijerph13050455

Active Traveling and Its Associations with Self-Rated Health, BMI and Physical Activity: A Comparative Study in the Adult Swedish Population

Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 564, Uppsala SE-75122, Sweden
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 3 March 2016 / Revised: 4 April 2016 / Accepted: 23 April 2016 / Published: 28 April 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [289 KB, uploaded 28 April 2016]

Abstract

Active traveling to a daily occupation means that an individual uses an active way of traveling between two destinations. Active travel to work or other daily occupations offers a convenient way to increase physical activity levels which is known to have positive effects on several health outcomes. Frequently used concepts in city planning and regional planning today are to create environments for active commuting and active living. Even then, little research has focused on traveling modes and subjective health outcomes such as self-rated health (SRH). This study aimed to explore and investigate associations between travel mode and health-related outcomes, such as self-rated health (SRH), body mass index (BMI) and overall physical activity, in an adult population in Sweden. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a randomly selected population-based sample (n = 1786, age 45–75 years); the respondents completed a questionnaire about their regular travel mode, demographics, lifestyle, BMI and SRH. Chi-square tests and logistic regressions found that inactive traveling was associated with poor SRH, a greater risk of obesity or being overweight and overall physical inactivity. In addition, lifestyle factors, such as choice of food and smoking habits, were associated with SRH, BMI and overall physical activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: active travel; commuting; self-rated health; BMI; physical activity; planning active travel; commuting; self-rated health; BMI; physical activity; planning
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Berglund, E.; Lytsy, P.; Westerling, R. Active Traveling and Its Associations with Self-Rated Health, BMI and Physical Activity: A Comparative Study in the Adult Swedish Population. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 455.

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