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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(4), 406; doi:10.3390/ijerph13040406

Nutrient Status and Contamination Risks from Digested Pig Slurry Applied on a Vegetable Crops Field

1
School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
2
College of Resource and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
3
Biogas Institute of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu 610041, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Miklas Scholz
Received: 20 January 2016 / Revised: 10 March 2016 / Accepted: 25 March 2016 / Published: 5 April 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [634 KB, uploaded 5 April 2016]   |  

Abstract

The effects of applied digested pig slurry on a vegetable crops field were studied. The study included a 3-year investigation on nutrient characteristics, heavy metals contamination and hygienic risks of a vegetable crops field in Wuhan, China. The results showed that, after anaerobic digestion, abundant N, P and K remained in the digested pig slurry while fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs and hookworm eggs were highly reduced. High Cr, Zn and Cu contents in the digested pig slurry were found in spring. Digested pig slurry application to the vegetable crops field led to improved soil fertility. Plant-available P in the fertilized soils increased due to considerable increase in total P content and decrease in low-availability P fraction. The As content in the fertilized soils increased slightly but significantly (p = 0.003) compared with control. The Hg, Zn, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Cu contents in the fertilized soils did not exceed the maximum permissible contents for vegetable crops soils in China. However, high Zn accumulation should be of concern due to repeated applications of digested pig slurry. No fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs or hookworm eggs were detected in the fertilized soils. View Full-Text
Keywords: anaerobic digestion; land application; nutrient; heavy metal; hygienic risk anaerobic digestion; land application; nutrient; heavy metal; hygienic risk
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Zhang, S.; Hua, Y.; Deng, L. Nutrient Status and Contamination Risks from Digested Pig Slurry Applied on a Vegetable Crops Field. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 406.

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