Next Article in Journal
Interactions of Six SNPs in ABCA1gene and Obesity in Low HDL-C Disease in Kazakh of China
Previous Article in Journal
Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(2), 165; doi:10.3390/ijerph13020165

Environmental Change in the Agro-Pastoral Transitional Zone, Northern China: Patterns, Drivers, and Implications

1,2,3,* and 1,3,*
1
Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
2
College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
3
Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences & Ministry of Water Resources, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi Province, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yu-Pin Lin
Received: 3 November 2015 / Revised: 9 January 2016 / Accepted: 14 January 2016 / Published: 28 January 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4521 KB, uploaded 28 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

Chengde city is located in the agro–pastoral transitional zone in northern China near the capital city of Beijing, which has experienced large-scale ecological construction in the past three decades. This study quantitatively assessed the environmental changes in Chengde through observation records of water resources, water environment, atmospheric environment, and vegetation activity and investigated the possible causes. From the late 1950s to 2002, the streamflow presented a downward trend induced by climate variability and human activities, with contribution ratios of 33.2% and 66.8%, respectively. During 2001–2012, the days of levels I and II air quality presented clear upward trends. Moreover, the air pollutant concentration was relatively low compared with that in the adjacent areas, which means the air quality has improved more than that in the neighboring areas. The water quality, which deteriorated during 1993–2000, began to improve in 2002. The air and water quality changes were closely related to pollutant emissions induced by anthropogenic activities. During 1982–2012, the vegetation in the southeastern and central regions presented restoration trends, whereas that in the northwestern area showed degradation trends. The pixels with obvious degradation trends correlated significantly with annual mean temperature and annual precipitation. Ecological engineering also played a positive role in vegetation restoration. This analysis can be beneficial to environment managers in the active response and adaptation to the possible effects of future climate change, population growth, and industrial development and can be used to ensure sustainable development and environmental safety. View Full-Text
Keywords: agro–pastoral transitional zone; water resource; water environment; atmospheric environment; vegetation activity agro–pastoral transitional zone; water resource; water environment; atmospheric environment; vegetation activity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Jiang, C.; Wang, F. Environmental Change in the Agro-Pastoral Transitional Zone, Northern China: Patterns, Drivers, and Implications. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 165.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top