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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(12), 1232; doi:10.3390/ijerph13121232

Health Profile of Construction Workers in Hong Kong

Department of Building and Real Estate, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 22 September 2016 / Revised: 25 November 2016 / Accepted: 6 December 2016 / Published: 13 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effecting a Safe and Healthy Environment in Construction)
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Abstract

Construction is a manual, heavy, and complex sector concerning the most fatal accidents and high incidence of occupational illnesses and injuries resulting in days away from work. In Hong Kong, “Pilot Medical Examination Scheme for Construction Workers” was launched in 2014 to detect the health problems of their construction workforce. All registered workers under the Construction Workers Registration Board are eligible to join the scheme. The purpose of this paper is to assess the physical condition, physiological status, and musculoskeletal disorders of 942 construction workers in Hong Kong. This study adopted a two-phase design, which includes a basic medical examination to measure the workers’ physiological parameters, such as blood pressure, resting heart rate, glucose, cholesterol, uric acid, liver function test, and renal function test; as well as a face-to-face interview following the medical examination to collect their demographic information and pain experience. Individual characteristics, including gender, age, obesity, alcohol drinking habit, and sleeping habit influenced the health condition of construction workers. Among the participants, 36.1% and 6.5% of them were overweight and obese, respectively. In addition, 43.0%, 38.4%, 16.2%, and 13.9% of the participants exceeded the thresholds of cholesterol, blood pressure, urea nitrogen, and uric urea, correspondingly. Moreover, 41.0% of the participants suffered musculoskeletal pain, where the most frequent painful parts occur in the lower back, shoulder, knees, leg, and neck. Through these findings, a series of important issues that need to be addressed is pointed out in terms of maintaining the physical well-being and reducing musculoskeletal disorders of construction workers. The finding may have implications for formulating proper intervention strategies for the sustainable development of Hong Kong’s construction industry. View Full-Text
Keywords: Hong Kong; construction industry; musculoskeletal pain; clinical examination; questionnaire survey Hong Kong; construction industry; musculoskeletal pain; clinical examination; questionnaire survey
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Yi, W.; Chan, A. Health Profile of Construction Workers in Hong Kong. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1232.

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