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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(12), 1201; doi:10.3390/ijerph13121201

Hazard Management Dealt by Safety Professionals in Colleges: The Impact of Individual Factors

1
Department of Industrial Education and Technology, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 50074, Taiwan
2
Department of Industrial Safety, Ju-Kao Engineering Co., Ltd., Taichung 43541, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Albert P. C. Chan and Wen Yi
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 24 November 2016 / Accepted: 28 November 2016 / Published: 3 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effecting a Safe and Healthy Environment in Construction)
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Abstract

Identifying, evaluating, and controlling workplace hazards are important functions of safety professionals (SPs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the content and frequency of hazard management dealt by safety professionals in colleges. The authors also explored the effects of organizational factors/individual factors on SPs’ perception of frequency of hazard management. The researchers conducted survey research to achieve the objective of this study. The researchers mailed questionnaires to 200 SPs in colleges after simple random sampling, then received a total of 144 valid responses (response rate = 72%). Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the hazard management scale (HMS) extracted five factors, including physical hazards, biological hazards, social and psychological hazards, ergonomic hazards, and chemical hazards. Moreover, the top 10 hazards that the survey results identified that safety professionals were most likely to deal with (in order of most to least frequent) were: organic solvents, illumination, other chemicals, machinery and equipment, fire and explosion, electricity, noise, specific chemicals, human error, and lifting/carrying. Finally, the results of one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated there were four individual factors that impacted the perceived frequency of hazard management which were of statistical and practical significance: job tenure in the college of employment, type of certification, gender, and overall job tenure. SPs within colleges and industries can now discuss plans revolving around these five areas instead of having to deal with all of the separate hazards. View Full-Text
Keywords: safety professional; hazard management; individual factors safety professional; hazard management; individual factors
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Wu, T.-C.; Chen, C.-H.; Yi, N.-W.; Lu, P.-C.; Yu, S.-C.; Wang, C.-P. Hazard Management Dealt by Safety Professionals in Colleges: The Impact of Individual Factors. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1201.

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