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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(11), 1146; doi:10.3390/ijerph13111146

Bacterial Biotransformation of Pentachlorophenol and Micropollutants Formed during Its Production Process

Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague 16628, Czech Republic
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mohamed-Bassem A. Ashour
Received: 16 September 2016 / Revised: 7 November 2016 / Accepted: 8 November 2016 / Published: 17 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
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Abstract

Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a toxic and persistent wood and cellulose preservative extensively used in the past decades. The production process of PCP generates polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) as micropollutants. PCDD/Fs are also known to be very persistent and dangerous for human health and ecosystem functioning. Several physico-chemical and biological technologies have been used to remove PCP and PCDD/Fs from the environment. Bacterial degradation appears to be a cost-effective way of removing these contaminants from soil while causing little impact on the environment. Several bacteria that cometabolize or use these pollutants as their sole source of carbon have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes current knowledge on the metabolic pathways of bacterial degradation of PCP and PCDD/Fs. PCP can be successfully degraded aerobically or anaerobically by bacteria. Highly chlorinated PCDD/Fs are more likely to be reductively dechlorinated, while less chlorinated PCDD/Fs are more prone to aerobic degradation. The biochemical and genetic basis of these pollutants’ degradation is also described. There are several documented studies of effective applications of bioremediation techniques for the removal of PCP and PCDD/Fs from soil and sediments. These findings suggest that biodegradation can occur and be applied to treat these contaminants. View Full-Text
Keywords: pentachlorophenol; polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins; polychlorinated dibenzofurans; bioremediation; wood preservation; contaminated soil; bacterial degradation pentachlorophenol; polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins; polychlorinated dibenzofurans; bioremediation; wood preservation; contaminated soil; bacterial degradation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lopez-Echartea, E.; Macek, T.; Demnerova, K.; Uhlik, O. Bacterial Biotransformation of Pentachlorophenol and Micropollutants Formed during Its Production Process. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1146.

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