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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 15; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010015

When Free Is Not for Me: Confronting the Barriers to Use of Free Quitline Telephone Counseling for Tobacco Dependence

1
Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City College of New York, New York, NY 10031, USA
2
Fay W Boozman College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
3
Walnut Street Works, Inc., Helena-West Helena, AR 72342, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mark Edberg, Barbara E. Hayes, Valerie Montgomery Rice and Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 14 August 2015 / Revised: 27 October 2015 / Accepted: 30 October 2015 / Published: 22 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [235 KB, uploaded 22 December 2015]

Abstract

Remarkable disparities in smoking rates in the United States contribute significantly to socioeconomic and minority health disparities. Access to treatment for tobacco use can help address these disparities, but quitlines, our most ubiquitous treatment resource, reach just 1%–2% of smokers. We used community-based participatory methods to develop a survey instrument to assess barriers to use of the quitline in the Arkansas Mississippi delta. Barriers were quitline specific and barriers to cessation more broadly. Over one-third (34.9%) of respondents (n = 799) did not have access to a telephone that they could use for the quitline. Respondents reported low levels of knowledge about the quitline, quitting, and trust in tobacco treatment programs as well as considerable ambivalence about quitting including significant concerns about getting sick if they quit and strong faith-based beliefs about quitting. These findings suggest quitlines are not accessible to all lower socioeconomic groups and that significant barriers to use include barriers to cessation. These findings suggest targets for providing accessible tobacco use treatment services and addressing concerns about cessation among lower income, ethnic minority, and rural groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: quitline; tobacco dependence; barriers to treatment; low-income; ethnic minority; rural quitline; tobacco dependence; barriers to treatment; low-income; ethnic minority; rural
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Sheffer, C.; Brackman, S.; Lercara, C.; Cottoms, N.; Olson, M.; Panissidi, L.; Pittman, J.; Stayna, H. When Free Is Not for Me: Confronting the Barriers to Use of Free Quitline Telephone Counseling for Tobacco Dependence. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 15.

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