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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(9), 10923-10940; doi:10.3390/ijerph120910923

Infant Feeding Practices of Emirati Women in the Rapidly Developing City of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

1
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
2
International Horizons College, 42nd Floor, U-Bora Towers, Al Abraj Street, Business Bay, Dubai P.O. Box 191881, United Arab Emirates
3
School of Natural Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Perth, WA 6027, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jane Scott and Colin Binns
Received: 28 July 2015 / Revised: 24 August 2015 / Accepted: 27 August 2015 / Published: 2 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breastfeeding and Infant Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [717 KB, uploaded 2 September 2015]

Abstract

Rapid economic and cultural transition in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has been accompanied by new challenges to public health; most notably a rapid rise in chronic disease. Breastfeeding is known to improve health outcomes in adulthood, is associated with reduced risk of developing chronic disease, and is therefore an important public health issue for this rapidly increasing population. Factors associated with infant feeding practices were examined in a cohort of 125 Emirati women and their infants, with data collected at birth and 3, 6 and 15 months postpartum by questionnaires and interviews. Participants were recruited in the Corniche Hospital, the main maternity hospital in the city of Abu Dhabi. Factors affecting the duration of breastfeeding and the introduction of complementary foods were investigated using univariate and multivariate statistics. Recommended infant feeding practices, such as exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and timely introduction of appropriate complementary foods, were poorly adhered to. Factors implicated in early cessation of breastfeeding included: time to first breastfeed, mother’s education level, employment status and early introduction of complementary foods. View Full-Text
Keywords: breastfeeding; complementary feeding; developing country; United Arab Emirates; infant feeding breastfeeding; complementary feeding; developing country; United Arab Emirates; infant feeding
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Gardner, H.; Green, K.; Gardner, A. Infant Feeding Practices of Emirati Women in the Rapidly Developing City of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 10923-10940.

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