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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(8), 9938-9951; doi:10.3390/ijerph120809938

An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study

1
Division of Neonatology and NICU, Institute for Maternal and Child Health—IRCCS "Burlo Garofolo", Trieste, TS-34137, Italy
2
Clinical Epidemiology and Public Health Research Unit, Institute for Maternal and Child Health—IRCCS "Burlo Garofolo", Trieste, TS-34137, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jane Scott and Colin Binns
Received: 12 June 2015 / Revised: 6 August 2015 / Accepted: 17 August 2015 / Published: 20 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breastfeeding and Infant Health)
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Abstract

Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth. View Full-Text
Keywords: International Board Certified Lactation Consultant; breastfeeding promotion; mother and child hospital International Board Certified Lactation Consultant; breastfeeding promotion; mother and child hospital
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Chiurco, A.; Montico, M.; Brovedani, P.; Monasta, L.; Davanzo, R. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 9938-9951.

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