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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(8), 9265-9281; doi:10.3390/ijerph120809265

Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study

Institute for Occupational Safety and Environmental Health, Riga Stradins University, Dzirciema Street 16, Riga LV 1007, Latvia
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 1 June 2015 / Revised: 24 July 2015 / Accepted: 28 July 2015 / Published: 7 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor activities and health risks/protection)
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Abstract

Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism. The aim of our study was to evaluate the dynamics of skin surface temperature in the hand during prolonged computer mouse work under different ergonomic setups. Digital infrared imaging of the right forearm and wrist was performed during three hours of continuous computer work (measured at the start and every 15 minutes thereafter) in a laboratory with controlled ambient conditions. Four people participated in the study. Three different ergonomic computer mouse setups were tested on three different days (horizontal computer mouse without mouse pad; horizontal computer mouse with mouse pad and padded wrist support; vertical computer mouse without mouse pad). The study revealed a significantly strong negative correlation between the temperature of the dorsal surface of the wrist and time spent working with a computer mouse. Hand skin temperature decreased markedly after one hour of continuous computer mouse work. Vertical computer mouse work preserved more stable and higher temperatures of the wrist (>30 °C), while continuous use of a horizontal mouse for more than two hours caused an extremely low temperature (<28 °C) in distal parts of the hand. The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia. View Full-Text
Keywords: computer mouse; cold hands; digital infrared imaging; ergonomics; hypothermia; sedentary work; wrist temperature computer mouse; cold hands; digital infrared imaging; ergonomics; hypothermia; sedentary work; wrist temperature
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MDPI and ACS Style

Reste, J.; Zvagule, T.; Kurjane, N.; Martinsone, Z.; Martinsone, I.; Seile, A.; Vanadzins, I. Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 9265-9281.

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