Next Article in Journal
In Search of an Integrative Measure of Functioning
Previous Article in Journal
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Dagang Oilfield (China): Distribution, Sources, and Risk Assessment
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Negative Affect Hypothesis of Noise Sensitivity
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 5792-5814; doi:10.3390/ijerph120605792

Development of a Quantitative Methodology to Assess the Impacts of Urban Transport Interventions and Related Noise on Well-Being

1
European Centre for Environment and Health, World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe, Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1, 53113 Bonn, Germany
2
Federal Environment Agency, Section II 1.6 Exposure Assessment and Environmental Health Indicators, 14195 Berlin, Germany
3
School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Road, Bristol BS8 1SS, UK
4
Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Environmental Engineering Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
5
Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands
6
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Socinstr. 57, 4002 Basel, Switzerland
7
University of Basel, Peterspl. 1, 4003 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Lercher
Received: 30 January 2015 / Revised: 7 May 2015 / Accepted: 15 May 2015 / Published: 26 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sound and Health related Quality of Life)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [744 KB, uploaded 26 May 2015]

Abstract

Well-being impact assessments of urban interventions are a difficult challenge, as there is no agreed methodology and scarce evidence on the relationship between environmental conditions and well-being. The European Union (EU) project “Urban Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China and Europe” (URGENCHE) explored a methodological approach to assess traffic noise-related well-being impacts of transport interventions in three European cities (Basel, Rotterdam and Thessaloniki) linking modeled traffic noise reduction effects with survey data indicating noise-well-being associations. Local noise models showed a reduction of high traffic noise levels in all cities as a result of different urban interventions. Survey data indicated that perception of high noise levels was associated with lower probability of well-being. Connecting the local noise exposure profiles with the noise-well-being associations suggests that the urban transport interventions may have a marginal but positive effect on population well-being. This paper also provides insight into the methodological challenges of well-being assessments and highlights the range of limitations arising from the current lack of reliable evidence on environmental conditions and well-being. Due to these limitations, the results should be interpreted with caution. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban policies; climate change; mitigation; greenhouse gas; transport; noise; well-being; impact assessment urban policies; climate change; mitigation; greenhouse gas; transport; noise; well-being; impact assessment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Braubach, M.; Tobollik, M.; Mudu, P.; Hiscock, R.; Chapizanis, D.; Sarigiannis, D.A.; Keuken, M.; Perez, L.; Martuzzi, M. Development of a Quantitative Methodology to Assess the Impacts of Urban Transport Interventions and Related Noise on Well-Being. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5792-5814.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top