Next Article in Journal
Exposure Monitoring and Risk Assessment of Biphenyl in the Workplace
Previous Article in Journal
Prevalence of Mental Disorders in 6–16-Year-Old Students in Sichuan Province, China
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(5), 5108-5115; doi:10.3390/ijerph120505108

Identification, Characterization and Antibiotic Resistance of Bacterial Isolates Obtained from Waterpipe Device Hoses

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan
2
Department of Biology, Yarmouk University, Irbid 22110, Jordan
3
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan
4
Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan
5
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, Medina 41411, Saudi Arabia
6
Princesses Basma Teaching Hospital, Irbid 21110, Jordan
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 27 March 2015 / Revised: 5 May 2015 / Accepted: 8 May 2015 / Published: 13 May 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [768 KB, uploaded 18 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

The general lack of knowledge about the health effects of waterpipe smoking is among the reasons for its global spread. In this study, bacterial contamination of waterpipe hoses was investigated. Twenty hoses were collected from waterpipe cafés and screened for bacterial pathogens using standard culture and isolation techniques. Additionally, resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by identifying the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each isolate. Forty eight bacterial isolates were detected. Isolates included both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from species that included Micrococcus (12), Corynebacterium (13) and Bacillus (9). In addition, some of the detected pathogens were found to be resistant to aztreonam (79%), cefixime (79%), norfloxacin, amoxicillin (47%), clarithromycin (46%) and enrofloxacin (38%). In conclusion, the hose of the waterpipe device is a good environment for the growth of bacterial pathogens, which can then be transmitted to users. View Full-Text
Keywords: waterpipe; hose; bacteria; isolates; antibiotics resistance waterpipe; hose; bacteria; isolates; antibiotics resistance
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Masadeh, M.M.; Hussein, E.I.; Alzoubi, K.H.; Khabour, O.; Shakhatreh, M.A.K.; Gharaibeh, M. Identification, Characterization and Antibiotic Resistance of Bacterial Isolates Obtained from Waterpipe Device Hoses. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5108-5115.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top