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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(5), 4709-4725; doi:10.3390/ijerph120504709

Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

1
Department of Psychiatry, Athens University Medical School, Eginition Hospital, 74 Vas. Sofias Ave., Athens 11528, Greece
2
University Mental Health Research Institute, 27 Soranou tou Efesiou str., Athens 11527, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 5 December 2014 / Revised: 26 March 2015 / Accepted: 16 April 2015 / Published: 29 April 2015
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Abstract

Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results: State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024) and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039) respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students’ origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students’ school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students’ family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7%) do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck’s depression inventory scale. Conclusions: Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students’ college life. View Full-Text
Keywords: college students; psychopathology; depression; personality; disorder; somatization college students; psychopathology; depression; personality; disorder; somatization
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kontoangelos, K.; Tsiori, S.; Koundi, K.; Pappa, X.; Sakkas, P.; Papageorgiou, C.C. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 4709-4725.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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