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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(3), 2622-2638; doi:10.3390/ijerph120302622

Effects of Weather and Heliophysical Conditions on Emergency Ambulance Calls for Elevated Arterial Blood Pressure

1
Department of Environmental Sciences, Vytautas Magnus University, Donelaicio St. 58, Kaunas 44248, Lithuania
2
Department of Cardiology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Eiveniu Str. 2, Kaunas LT-50028, Lithuania
3
Department of Disaster Medicine, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Eiveniu Str. 4, Kaunas LT-50028, Lithuania
4
Department of Orthodontics, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Luksos-Daumanto Str. 6, Kaunas LT-50106, Lithuania
5
Kaunas Emergency Medical Service Station, KaunasLT-51271, Lithuania
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 December 2014 / Revised: 16 February 2015 / Accepted: 17 February 2015 / Published: 27 February 2015
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Abstract

We hypothesized that weather and space weather conditions were associated with the exacerbation of essential hypertension. The study was conducted during 2009–2010 in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. We analyzed 13,475 cards from emergency ambulance calls (EACs), in which the conditions for the emergency calls were made coded I.10–I.15. The Kaunas Weather Station provided daily records of air temperature (T), wind speed (WS), relative humidity, and barometric pressure (BP). We evaluated the associations between daily weather variables and daily number of EACs by applying a multivariate Poisson regression. Unfavorable heliophysical conditions (two days after the active-stormy geomagnetic field or the days with solar WS > 600 km/s) increased the daily number of elevated arterial blood pressure (EABP) by 12% (RR = 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–1.21); and WS ≥ 3.5 knots during days of T < 1.5 °C and T ≥ 12.5 °C by 8% (RR = 1.08; CI 1.04–1.12). An increase of T by 10 °C and an elevation of BP two days after by 10 hPa were associated with a decrease in RR by 3%. An additional effect of T was detected during days of T ≥ 17.5 °C only in females. Women and patients with grade III arterial hypertension at the time of the ambulance call were more sensitive to weather conditions. These results may help in the understanding of the population’s sensitivity to different weather conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: emergency ambulance calls; arterial blood pressure; weather; risk emergency ambulance calls; arterial blood pressure; weather; risk
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Vencloviene, J.; Babarskiene, R.M.; Dobozinskas, P.; Sakalyte, G.; Lopatiene, K.; Mikelionis, N. Effects of Weather and Heliophysical Conditions on Emergency Ambulance Calls for Elevated Arterial Blood Pressure. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 2622-2638.

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