Next Article in Journal
Bacteria that Travel: The Quality of Aircraft Water
Previous Article in Journal
Association between Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms with Childhood Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Changes in Active Commuting to School in Czech Adolescents in Different Types of Built Environment across a 10-Year Period
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(11), 13923-13937; doi:10.3390/ijerph121113923

Relationship between Objectively Measured Transportation Behaviors and Health Characteristics in Older Adults

1
Department of Family Medicine Public Health, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093, USA
2
Center for Children’s Healthy Lifestyles and Nutrition, Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO 60148, USA
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou and Brian Caulfield
Received: 31 July 2015 / Accepted: 26 October 2015 / Published: 30 October 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transport Impacts on Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [460 KB, uploaded 2 November 2015]

Abstract

This study used objective Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to investigate the relationship between pedestrian and vehicle trips to physical, cognitive, and psychological functioning in older adults living in retirement communities. Older adults (N = 279; mean age = 83 ± 6 years) wore a GPS and accelerometer for 6 days. Participants completed standard health measures. The Personal Activity and Location Measurement System (PALMS) was used to calculate the average daily number of trips, distance, and minutes traveled for pedestrian and vehicle trips from the combined GPS and accelerometer data. Linear mixed effects regression models explored relationships between these transportation variables and physical, psychological and cognitive functioning. Number, distance, and minutes of pedestrian trips were positively associated with physical and psychological functioning but not cognitive functioning. Number of vehicle trips was negatively associated with fear of falls; there were no other associations between the vehicle trip variables and functioning. Vehicle travel did not appear to be related to functioning in older adults in retirement communities except that fear of falling was related to number of vehicle trips. Pedestrian trips had moderate associations with multiple physical and psychological functioning measures, supporting a link between walking and many aspects of health in older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical mobility; life-space mobility; older adults; Global Positioning System (GPS); physical functioning; psychological functioning; cognitive functioning; health physical mobility; life-space mobility; older adults; Global Positioning System (GPS); physical functioning; psychological functioning; cognitive functioning; health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Takemoto, M.; Carlson, J.A.; Moran, K.; Godbole, S.; Crist, K.; Kerr, J. Relationship between Objectively Measured Transportation Behaviors and Health Characteristics in Older Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 13923-13937.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top